The San Remo: A Timeless Landmark on Central Park West

CEO Khai Intela
The San Remo, located at 145-146 Central Park West in Manhattan, New York City, is an iconic cooperative apartment building that stands as a testament to architectural grandeur. Constructed between 1929 and 1930, it was...

The San Remo

The San Remo, located at 145-146 Central Park West in Manhattan, New York City, is an iconic cooperative apartment building that stands as a testament to architectural grandeur. Constructed between 1929 and 1930, it was designed by the renowned architect Emery Roth in the Renaissance Revival style. With its twin towers rising majestically from a 17-story base, the San Remo is a visual masterpiece that has captured the imagination of residents and passersby for decades.

A Sophisticated Design and Exquisite Details

The San Remo's architectural design is both captivating and timeless. The 27-story building features a steel superstructure and is characterized by its Renaissance Revival elements. The façade is adorned with decorative pilasters, engaged columns, triangular broken pediments, and balustrades, showcasing the utmost attention to detail. The first three stories are crafted from rusticated blocks of limestone, while the remainder of the building is clad in light brick with terracotta ornamentation.

San Remo Exterior The southern entrance on 145 Central Park West

The San Remo's towers are a sight to behold. Rising above the setbacks, they are crowned with magnificent "temples" designed in the Corinthian order. The temples feature circular colonnades and electric copper lanterns, adding a touch of elegance and grandeur to the building's silhouette. The San Remo's exterior is a visual feast, with every detail meticulously planned and executed.

A Rich History and Noteworthy Residents

The San Remo has a storied past that adds to its allure. It replaced an 11-story apartment building with the same name, built in 1891, and was the first building on Central Park West to incorporate large twin towers. Despite facing financial difficulties during the Great Depression, the San Remo has stood the test of time and has attracted a slew of notable residents over the years.

Directors, actors, musicians, and other luminaries have called the San Remo home. Its prestigious address and luxurious amenities have made it a sought-after residence for those seeking an exceptional living experience in the heart of Manhattan. Notable residents have included Steven Spielberg, Demi Moore, Bruce Willis, and Bono, to name just a few.

A Landmark of Distinction

The San Remo holds a special place in the architectural landscape of New York City. It has received several accolades and designations, including being listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places and being designated as a New York City landmark. Its architectural beauty and historical significance make it an essential part of the Central Park West Historic District.

The San Remo stands as a testament to the enduring allure of classic design and craftsmanship. Its timeless elegance continues to captivate residents and visitors alike. As the San Remo enters its next chapter, it remains a symbol of prestige, sophistication, and architectural excellence in the heart of Manhattan.

References:

  • Brockmann, Jorg; Harris, Bill (2002). One Thousand New York Buildings. Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers.
  • Central Park West Historic District (PDF) (Report). National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service. November 9, 1982.
  • Central Park West Historic District (PDF) (Report). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. April 24, 1990.
  • Macaulay-Lewis, Elizabeth (2021). Antiquity in Gotham: The Ancient Architecture of New York City. Fordham University Press.
  • Mason, Christopher (September 2, 1996). "West of Eden". New York Magazine. New York Media, LLC.
  • Ruttenbaum, Steven (1986). Mansions in the Clouds: The Skyscraper Palazzi of Emery Roth. Balsam Press.
  • The San Remo Apartments (PDF) (Report). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. March 31, 1987.
  • Stern, Robert A. M.; Gilmartin, Patrick; Mellins, Thomas (1987). New York 1930: Architecture and Urbanism Between the Two World Wars. New York: Rizzoli.
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